Related Resources

Wider Asia and Pacific Regional Learning Event on Service Delivery Approach to Rural Water Supply

Presentations

The RWSN Asia-Pacific Learning event was held in Bangkok, hosted by The World Bank, SNV and WaterAid Australia. 57 delegates from 14 governments attended to share knowledge and expertise on rural water services. | »

Human rights to water and Self-Supply – Potential and challenges

RWSN webinar on 24th November 2015 – Key messages and generic findings

Summary of generic messages:
1. The Human Right to water does not favour or exclude any management model for provision of safe water to all. The important objective is that eventually all people have universal access, that core principles are adhered to and that there is no difference in quality and access no matter which supply approach is used.
2. Self-supply is aligned and compatible with the concept of progressive realisation of the Human Right to Water.
3. Government’s role in Self-supply is to identify where and when Self-supply is an appropriate option to provide access to safe water. Additionally government should provide technical support, monitoring, financial support (e.g. subsidies), establish an enabling environment and recognize Self-supply as one viable option to achieving the Human Right to Water.
4. In Self-supply, like in other approaches, challenges might occur around affordability, water quality, monitoring, and long term sustainability. The Government must support people moving up the water ladder but also take preventive measures to avoid negative impacts from Self-supply.
5. To further scale up Self-supply subsidies might be an adequate means to allow poor people to move up the water ladder in incremental steps. Subsidies need to be designed and provided in a smart way, without distortion of the local economy. If subsidies are provided there is need to find sustainable funding sources.
6. As Self-supply will not be an option in all regions, and because the cost of using the community managed approach alone will be far too high, a blended approach using boreholes, piped schemes and Self-supply sources (using different technologies) might be the best way to go for achieving universal access in rural areas. | »

National Monitoring

Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

This third webinar in the series explores the latest state-of-play in national level monitoring of rural water supply, which presentations also of country-led monitoring systems. In these systems, information is collected, analysed and used to inform decentralized resource allocation. Case studies of national monitoring models were reviewed to understand the approaches used in embedding the systems and processes required for maintaining accurate and timely rural water supply information. These case studies also demonstrate the impact monitoring has had on extending equitable and sustainable service delivery and provide key learning points. | »

District Monitoring

Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

This second webinar visited case studies of district monitoring experiences in Ethiopia, Bolivia and Ghana to review the methods, costs, challenges and lessons to be learned from each experience. | »

Failure and the Future

Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

The fourth and final webinar in the RWSN Water Point Mapping series provided a candid account of the challenges with WPM that have led to failed objectives. There are, however, valuable lessons to be learned from those failures, and the experiences have provided useful models and contributed to improved knowledge and data banks. The webinar also discussed the future of WPM, including new models and initiatives to maximize the benefit of data monitoring and improve information accessibility and transparency. | »